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App Development

Getting Started with FMDB and Swift: A Guide

Sasmito Adibowo
Sasmito Adibowo
Getting Started with FMDB and Swift: A Guide
December 20, 2022
16
min read

Apple provides a few options for structured data storage, including JSON files, property lists, local SQL databases, Core Data, and CloudKit. All of these, except the local SQL database, have nice Swift interfaces. Apple includes SQLite in the iOS system libraries, which you can use as a local SQL database, but you have to deal with C-style functions to use it.

Then FMDB came along. FMDB stands for Flying Meat DataBase, from Gus Mueller’s Flying Meat Software, an indie macOS app company. FMDB provides an object-oriented interface on top of SQLite’s C API, adds multithreading support, and more. In fact, some of Flying Meat apps' file formats are SQLite database files.

This article aims to help you get started with SQLite and FMDB using Swift to target iOS. You’ll learn how to create a database file, update it, query it, and perform transactions on it. This post is not a complete reference to SQL, SQLite, or FMDB. I wrote this article assuming you have prior knowledge of SQL and Swift (the programming language, not the singer 😅).

Installing FMDB

The easiest way to install FMDB for your project is via the Swift Package Manager, accessible from Xcode’s GUI. Open Xcode and follow these steps.

  • Open the File menu and then select Add Packages…
  • In the dialog box that appears, paste FMDB’s URL (https://github.com/ccgus/fmdb) in the upper-right corner (in the search box).
  • Wait for Xcode to load FMDB’s package information.
  • In Dependency Rule, select Exact Version and then enter version 2.7.7. This locks the version of FMDB to the same one used in this article.
specify fmdb version
FMDB Package Configuration dialog
  • Click Add Package to add the FMDB package to your project.
  • In the Choose Package Products for fmdb dialog, add the FMDB package product to your app target(s), and then click Add Package.
fmdb add package
Add FMDB Package to Target(s)
  • FMDB is now installed in your project and ready for use.

Creating a Database

To open or create a database file, instantiate FMDatabase and give it a local file path. Then call that instance’s open() method. The object will create the file as required, but it won’t create any directory for it.

For example, the following Swift snippet creates opens an SQLite database file named myMusic.sqlite within the application support directory. It starts by ensuring that the directory exists and then creates or opens the database file there.


   let databaseDir = URL.applicationSupportDirectory.appending(path: "GettingStartedWithFMDBandSwift")
   try FileManager.default.createDirectory(at: databaseDir, withIntermediateDirectories: true)
   let databaseFile = databaseDir.appending(path: "myMusic.sqlite")
   theDatabase = FMDatabase(url: databaseFile)
   theDatabase.open()
   print("Database created at: \(databaseDir) ")   

Setting up Tables

Once you have a database open, use the executeStatements() method to create database tables or populate a database with an initial set of sample data. This method accepts multiple SQL statements. Hence, it’s perfect for use with SQL scripts read from a file coming from your app’s resources.


   theDatabase.executeStatements("""
   CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS songs (
       song_id INTEGER PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT NOT NULL,
       title TEXT NULL,
       artist TEXT NULL,
       album TEXT NULL,
       play_count INTEGER NULL
   );
   """)   

The above snippet creates the table that we’ll use for our subsequent examples. SQLite has a “… IF NOT EXISTS” parameter to CREATE TABLE that won’t error out if the table already exists. Hence, you can use this parameter in the SQL DDL script you run each time the app opens the database.

Inserting Rows

Use the executeUpdate(, values:) method to insert, update, or delete rows. Provide this method with one SQL statement. This method throws an error.

Use the executeQuery(, values:) method to query data. This method also throws an error. On success, it will return an FMResultSet object that is an iterator to the rows of the query results. Initially, this iterator points to before the first row. Thus, you need to call next() repeatedly to fetch the result rows. In turn, next() returns true when it fetches a row but false when it has no more rows in the result to fetch.

Now let’s try inserting two rows into the database and querying it. Take a look at the following code snippet. It has two calls to executeUpdate(, values:) and each inserts a row. They’re followed by executeQuery(, values:) and a while loop to iterate through the results.


   // populate database
   try theDatabase.executeUpdate("""
       INSERT INTO songs (
           title,
           album,
           artist
       ) VALUES (
           'Girlfriend',
           'The Best Damn Thing',
           'Avril Lavigne'
       )
   """, values: nil)
   try theDatabase.executeUpdate("""
       INSERT INTO songs (
           title,
           album,
           artist
       ) VALUES (
           'Ska8ter Boi',
           'Let Go',
           'Avril Lavigne'
       )
   """, values: nil)
           
   // query it
   let resultSet = try theDatabase.executeQuery("""
       SELECT album FROM songs WHERE artist = 'Avril Lavigne'
   """, values: nil)
   
   print("... and the albums are:")
   var resultNumber = 0;
   while(resultSet.next()) {
       resultNumber = resultNumber + 1
       let albumName = resultSet.string(forColumn: "album") ?? "*[NULL]*"
       print("\(resultNumber). \(albumName)")
   }   

The example above obtains the column value through the string(forColumn:) method of FMResultSet by specifying the album column by name. This method has other variations, one for each SQLite data type.

You can see the result of that snippet below. Remember that SQL doesn’t order result sets by default; thus, you might have the results reversed when you run it yourself.


  ... and the albums are:
      1. The Best Damn Thing
      2. Let Go

Getting Results

In addition to rows, FMResultSet can also return columns of the result. Use its columnCount property and retrieve the column names via their indices using the columnName(forColumnIndex:) method. Likewise, FMResultSet supports retrieving column values via their indices.

The following code snippet applies that capability to print a markdown table from a result set. First, it iterates through the column names to print the table header. Second, it iterates through the result set by indexing column values.


   func printRows(_ resultSet: FMResultSet) {
      guard resultSet.columnCount > 0 else {
          print("ResultSet is empty")
          return
      }
      
      // print table column header
      print("\n|", terminator: "")
      for columnIndex in 0..<resultSet.columnCount {
          let columnName = resultSet.columnName(for: columnIndex) ?? "*[UNTITLED]*"
          print(" \(columnName) |", terminator: "")
      }
      print("\n|",terminator: "")
      for _ in 0..<resultSet.columnCount {
          print("---|", terminator: "")
      }
      print("")
      
      var resultNumber = 0;
      while(resultSet.next()) {
          resultNumber = resultNumber + 1
          print("|", terminator: "")
          for columnIndex in 0..<resultSet.columnCount {
              let columnValueAsString = resultSet.string(forColumnIndex: columnIndex)  ?? "*[NULL]*"
              print(" \(columnValueAsString) |", terminator: "")
          }
          print("")
      }
      print("\nTotal: \(resultNumber) row(s)")
  }  

Insert and Update

Now let’s try inserting rows and updating them. First, we insert a row. Second, we update that row. Third, we query the results.

Initial Data Set

As before, use executeUpdate(, values:) to insert a row into the database. The next snippet shows how to retrieve the identity of the most recent row insert with lastInsertRowID. You can use this value by matching it with the hidden column _rowid_ in SQL queries.


   // Insert one row
   try theDatabase.executeUpdate("""
   INSERT INTO songs (
       title,
       album,
       artist
   ) VALUES (
       'Begin Again',
       'Red',
       'Taylor Swift'
   )
   """, values: nil)
   
   // Get the last inserted row and query it.
   let lastInsertRowID = theDatabase.lastInsertRowId
   let insertResults = try theDatabase.executeQuery("""
   SELECT * FROM songs WHERE _rowid_=\(lastInsertRowID)
   """, values:nil)
   print("Result of insert follows...")
   printRows(insertResults)

As expected, the query returns the row we just inserted:

result of insert follows

Updated Data Set

We now use the executeUpdate(,values:) method to update a row. Afterward, we query the results to check our update.


   try theDatabase.executeUpdate("""
   UPDATE songs SET
       title = 'Begin Again (Taylor''s Version)',
       album = 'Red (Taylor''s Version)'
   WHERE
       artist = 'Taylor Swift'
       AND album = 'Red'
       AND title = 'Begin Again'
   """, values: nil)
   
   let updateResults = try theDatabase.executeQuery("""
       SELECT * FROM songs
   """, values: nil)
   print("Result of update follows...")
   printRows(updateResults)   

Notice the SQL UPDATE statement above has duplicated single quotes, namely, the new suffix “… (Taylor’s Version)” of the updated song title and album. That’s how you escape quotes in SQL statements, not by using backslashes, but by doubling single quotes. If you don’t escape those quotes, SQLite will think that the string has ended and interpret the characters after that as part of the SQL statement (which will create syntax errors in our example). Later you’ll see how to avoid escaping quotes safely.

As expected, the code snippet above correctly updates our record, analogous to how Taylor Swift updated her old songs to regain distribution rights… 😉

result of update follows

Sanitizing Data

The previous code examples show SQL statements with embedded string data. I deliberately used that style to keep the examples simple. However, this is not the way to write production applications. The problems are twofold:

  • The hassle of escaping those strings — quotes, newlines, and tabs, and the like
  • The risk of SQL Injection attack

Production-grade SQL strings would use parameterized queries. That is, SQL strings do not contain data values. This has double benefits:

  • It’s safer and less error-prone, that is, sanitized.
  • It’s potentially faster since SQLite can parse and compile those statements once to run them many times.

Inserting Rows

Use the method executeUpdate(, withParameterDictionary:) to use parameterized database updates. The first parameter is an SQL statement having placeholder values instead of real data values, whereas the second parameter is a dictionary that maps those placeholder values with real data values. An example follows.

The code snippet below inserts a row using a parameterized SQL statement. Have a look at the INSERT INTO statement and notice that the values are placeholders. These placeholders are identifiers prefixed with a colon. Then we provide the actual data values in the initialRowValues dictionary of the code snippet, keyed by those placeholders sans colons.


   let initialRowValues = [
   "title" : "Stay Stay Stay",
   "album" : "Red",
   "artist" : "Taylor Swift",
   "play_count" : 42
] as [String : Any]
theDatabase.executeUpdate("""
INSERT INTO songs (
   title,
   album,
   artist,
   play_count
) VALUES (
   :title,
   :album,
   :artist,
   :play_count
)
""", withParameterDictionary: initialRowValues)

let insertResults = try theDatabase.executeQuery("""
   SELECT * FROM songs
""", values: nil)
print("Result of insert follows...")
printRows(insertResults)

Running the snippet above will insert data from the initialRowValues dictionary into the database.

result of insert follows

Updating Rows

The parameter dictionary given to executeUpdate(, withParameterDictionary:) has arbitrary keys. These keys do not need to match any column name. They only need to match the parameters as defined in the SQL script. I want to point out that the delta_play_count parameter in the example below does not correspond to any column name in the songs table.


   let updateRowValues = [
   "title" : "Stay Stay Stay",
   "album" : "Red",
   "artist" : "Taylor Swift",
   "delta_play_count" : 1
] as [String : Any]
theDatabase.executeUpdate("""
UPDATE songs SET
   play_count = play_count + :delta_play_count
WHERE
   title = :title
   AND album = :album
   AND artist = :artist
""", withParameterDictionary: updateRowValues)

Querying Rows

Parameterized queries work similarly. Use executeQuery(, withParameterDictionary:) and provide it with a parameterized SQL query and a dictionary containing the parameter values.


   let querySongValues = [
   "title" : "Stay Stay Stay",
   "album" : "Red",
   "artist" : "Taylor Swift"
]
let playCountResult = theDatabase.executeQuery("""
SELECT
   play_count
FROM songs
WHERE
   title = :title
   AND album = :album
   AND artist = :artist
""", withParameterDictionary: querySongValues)

if let playCountResult = playCountResult,
  playCountResult.next() {
   let updatedPlayCount = playCountResult.int(forColumn: "play_count")
   print("Updated play count: \(updatedPlayCount)")
}

Running the code snippet above shows that the play_count column has been updated correctly.


   Updated play count: 43
You use transactions when you need several operations run as a single group

Transactions

You use transactions when you need several operations run as a single group. It allows a group of insert, update, and delete statements to all take effect or to be canceled as a single group. Furthermore, SQLite allows database schema changes as part of transactions.

Transactions end with either a commit or a rollback. When a transaction commits, all changes are applied to the database. If not explicitly specified, FMDB will implicitly create a transaction around each SQL operation, commit it upon success, and roll it back upon failure.

To begin a transaction, use the beginTransaction() method of FMDatabase. This method returns a boolean value indicating success or failure. In the event of a failure, more information is available in the lastError property.

To commit a transaction, use the commit() method of FMDatabase. Similarly, the rollback() method rolls back transactions. These methods also return a boolean value and leave error information in the lastError property.

Before we start our transaction examples, let’s define a method to print the songs table for subsequent snippets.


   func printSongsTable() throws {
      let results = try theDatabase.executeQuery("""
      SELECT * FROM songs
      """, values: nil)
      printRows(results)
  }

This section will show how transactions are committed or rolled back in two similar sample code snippets. The main difference between the two samples is that one commits, and the other one rolls back.

Sample Data

Let’s define a method to populate the songs table for our examples in this section. This time it fills the table with two songs from different albums and their respective play counts.


   func populateRecords() {
      let dataValues = [
          [
              "title" : "Keep Being You",
              "album" : "EXPLORE! (Special Edition)",
              "artist" : "Isyana Sarasvati",
              "play_count" : 11
          ],
          [
              "title" : "The Moon Represents My Heart",
              "album" : "Home Sweet Home (Deluxe Version)",
              "artist" : "Katherine Jenkins",
              "play_count" : 23
          ]
      ] as [[String : Any]]
  
      for rowValue in dataValues {
          theDatabase.executeUpdate("""
          INSERT INTO songs (
              title,
              album,
              artist,
              play_count
          ) VALUES (
              :title,
              :album,
              :artist,
              :play_count
          )
          """, withParameterDictionary: rowValue)
      }  

The Happy Case

The following code snippet shows an example of a successful transaction. It starts a transaction, updates the play count for a song, and then commits the transaction.


   populateRecords()

   print("Initial table contents")
   try printSongsTable()
   
   if !theDatabase.beginTransaction() {
       throw theDatabase.lastError()
   }
   try theDatabase.executeUpdate("""
   UPDATE songs SET
       play_count = play_count + 6
   WHERE
       artist = 'Isyana Sarasvati'
   """, values: nil)
   if !theDatabase.commit() {
       throw theDatabase.lastError()
   }
   
   print("Final table contents...")
   try printSongsTable()
   

The following table shows the table from before the transaction began. It shows the initial set of rows.

the happy case

The next table shows a committed transaction post update. Notice that the song Keep Being You has a play count of 17, increased by six from its initial value of 11.

the happy case final table

The Failure Case

You can roll back to undo updates when something goes wrong in the middle of database operations. The following code snippet is similar to the previous one, but the transaction ends with a rollback. Hence, we undid the change.


   populateRecords()
   print("Initial table contents...")
   try printSongsTable()
   if !theDatabase.beginTransaction() {
       throw theDatabase.lastError()
   }
   try theDatabase.executeUpdate("""
   UPDATE songs SET
       play_count = play_count + 6
   WHERE
       artist = 'Isyana Sarasvati'
   """, values: nil)
   
   print("The table inside a transaction...")
   try printSongsTable()
   
   if !theDatabase.rollback() {
       throw theDatabase.lastError()
   }
   
   print("The table after rollback...")
   try printSongsTable()   

The following table shows the initial table contents, unchanged from the previous section’s example.

failure case initial table

The following table depicts what it looks like during the transaction. Notice that the song Keep Being You has an updated play_count of 17.

failure case table inside transaction

In contrast, you’ll see the following table after rollback. Notice that the song Keep Being You has its play_count value reverted to 11.

table before rollback

Next Steps

You can download the source code for all the code snippets above from my Github project. I’ve provided those code snippets as unit tests you can run independently of one another.

Regarding tests, remember that FMDB does not syntax-checked the SQL scripts you write until they’re run. Therefore, you would need to have proper unit tests for each SQL statement to ensure that they would function correctly as you evolve your app. One good way of doing this is to utilize Waldo’s test suite organization solution. Start a free trial today!

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